Friday, 16 December 2011

On Stereotype.

Do read THIS ARTICLE first before you read my entry. After reading it myself, I just felt the need to point out a few things:

1. Hijab does not translate to TUDUNG. Hijab refers to donning clothes that cover your aurah, not just the TUDUNG.

2. While we all have the freedom to stereotype, and I'm not saying that he is wrong for stereotyping. BUT, this article is making fun of women who are, in some way rising closer towards Islam. And to me, as a Muslim, making fun of people who are putting an effort to somehow be closer to their deen, is wrong. He should be supporting these young Muslim girls who were once 'hijabless' and have finally found the courage&hidayah to change for the better.

3. How is using arabic words a funny/bad thing in the first place? I don't understand the need to make fun of it. It's the language of Al-Quran for heaven's sake. Why doesn't he make fun of the Muslims who use f**k, s**t or such words every 5 seconds updating their fb/twitter status. I think it's a very beautiful thing that more Muslims now are starting to use terms like Salam Alaykum, MasyaAllah and Alhamdulillah instead of HI, OMG and WTH on a daily basis.

4. It bugs me that he doesn't stereotype groups like Muslims with blonde hair in bikinis, hands around their guyfriends in clubs and bars, you know, the type that think their so cool and 'open-minded' that they drink beer and celebrate holloween/christmas. Why attack the girls who only want to use some Arabic terms to express something? I absolutely see no wrong in that. There are so much more disturbing things happening in Malaysia right now. To write something as narrow minded as the article itself is even more EMBARRASSING to me than what the author feels embarrassed about in the article.

5. I wish these cheap-publicity articles would just stop because it seems like these people are trying to find anything they can to make fun of hijabis, it's almost disturbing. 

In the words of my sister Maryam,

"The author has a very narrow sociolinguistic point of view. People do not talk in a lingo based on the way they dress.

It's mostly because young women find a community of friends like themselves to form a support system. Yes, they are women in hijab who strive to be better Muslimahs everyday and at the same time be successful in facing the challenges of the 21st century. They make friends with Muslim sisters who are newly converts, Palestinians to name a few-who are the strongest women in their world, and exceptional international women figures who fight for Islam. So in a way, they use terms like 'hijab, iftar, wudhu' to find a common ground in the Muslim community. They are mostly women of high education, grew up speaking English, fond of English culture and ambiance, could pull off any fashion trend if they weren't in hijabs, but choose to be better Muslimahs. No, they are not 'Melayu Murtad'. Islam is one."

Quote from my sister's Palestinian friend,

"It's good to have someone noticing the rising of hijabi girls, especilly that this is the first thing a girl should wear when the 'natural alarm date that Allah sets for her" has come. the non hijab is the trend of other nations "which invaded us"!! Again this brings us back to the debate "in the west" about a Muslim girl covering doesn't mean she covered her mind, too. Using Arabic words, is NOT a bad thing when referring to Islamic terms cause this language happens to be the language of the Holly Quran. so, using these words is not a trend Mr.. it's the ORIGIN. Which ever language you use for it, is nothing but a translation..."

Oh and ex-UIA students(and im sure many other Muslims from all over Malaysia) are so used to all these arabic words like iftar, taaruf, etc,  its so not new, so *BIG YAWN* to this article. The evolution of hijab trend began even before Yuna & Hana Tajima. They just made it more popular. If you go to UIA in 2004, You'll see a whole campus of girls looking like this. Most of them are Malay though who also use Arabic terms.


28 comments:

  1. agree with your words sister Aisha . the blogger himself is so narrow minded, obviously lost in his own words. i agree that there's NOTHING wrong about using arabic as it it the language of heaven or jannah. and i think the revolution of tudung or hijab today has brought the idea of " covering your aurah is not outdated " . isn't that a good thing ? of course it is ! the blogger just stating his point of view without realizing his own niat for sure. is he trying to bring all the people who wear tudung DOWN ? is the blogger happy if everyone did not cover their aurah ?

    all in all, i find the blogger is a naive, lack of religious knowledge in person ( this might be offensive, but if the blogger can judge us as a random ? why not me ?) thank you for the letting us know there are people who misjudged people who wears tudung sister Aisha .

    p/s : i'm an UIA student as well :)

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  2. Natasha: i agree with you! oh i miss uia so much!!<3 :)

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  3. I've read the article and i think this would be described as a humour or filler piece. something that doesn't require braincells to read but would be mildly entertaining.

    i don't think the author was out to be mean or out to condemn a certain group of people. he did mention that he supports women wearing hijab. it's just that now theres a new group of hijabi's that are a cross with hipsters.

    i think he was merely poking fun at the stereotype of it all (and you have to admit that there's a stereotype) just like how you poke fun at hipsters, blondes, those clubbing girls you mentioned, african americans (i'm trying to be politically correct here). he didn't mention anything about religious point of views or attitudes of hijabsters just pointing out lingo. the way he wrote about hijabsters was more like it was a pet peeve that he had.

    i know my comments may be disagreeable but it's just my opinion. also, you have a fantastic blog.

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  4. Natashamn: Thank you for dropping by;)) i appreciate your comment.

    Like I said, he is not wrong for stereotyping. and yes, there definitely are stereotypes. I just don't think it's appropriate to be making fun of a stereotype that is good in a lot of ways, in this case = using arabic words as a form of expression because it is the language of the holy quran. i mean, how is that funny? Then again. That's just my opinion too. While I found the part where he says "prime locations would be Starbucks, Subway (Sandwich) or Tutty Frutty.." to be quite amusing, I found no humor in "they can be quite embarrassing.." just like i find the stereotype of clubbing Muslims not funny, but simply troubling.

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  5. :) in love wit this article...
    But i have something bugging me..
    Regarding model muslimah
    Dere is no such thing as model muslimah..it is just model...

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  6. I agree on your counter post. Why must he say about something that is good for the younger girls generation.

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  7. salam sister, just bear with this people. they are everywhere, and the higher their education are, the higher possibility for them to become fooled by their own words.
    be patient. ALLAH is always with us. amin.

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  8. is it just me, or do these writers really love to make fun of hijabis? this is just one of the many series of articles i've read that seem to be targeting hijabis. i mean, one moment their comparing Yuna's headscarf to a nun, the next thing you know they make fun of hijabis for using Arabic terms..like really? What's next? do they not have better things to write about? why make something that is good in it's origin, and turn it into a joke? btw has anyone encountered such articles concerning non-hijabis recently? or i haven't been looking hard enough? not that i want to. just curious though.

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  9. Raihamina: jazakallah khair for your kind words:)

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  10. "Tudung? Tudung is so out of fashion, only aunties (makcik) and ustazah Bahiyah wear tudung." amboi, suka hati dia je nak kata only makcik wear tudung. I still wear tudung and I am not makcik yet. So narrow minded la penulis artikel tu.

    Haih.

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  11. i just read the article.
    it makes me so angry..
    i think that he shouldnt have done that

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  12. I agree with your sister and natashamn. I think there are far bigger concerns in the Muslim and Malay world than the use of Arabic words by "hijabsters".

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  13. Salam Aishah, Couldnt agree more my dear. Well said. Alhamdullilah. <3 *hugs*

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  14. in my point of view,I think the article should be banned simply because it might discourage our muslim girls to cover their aurah :(

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  15. salam..honestly, im not read it yet and IM NOT INTERESTED AT ALL to hv a courage n find his 'buang mase je bace' nyer ariticle. haiyooo..hijabi sisters, dont bother about it if u r not in d wrong path, let d haters do their stupid propaganda...kt x rugi pon klu ape y kt wat tu btol..huhu insyAllah..

    btw, i agree that using an arabic word is so cool and besides d fact that it is d holy Quran language, hmm i guess he should study at UIA kot..haha bcoz im an UIA-rian also ma..aisyah t kt ajar die pe mahallah, kuliyyah n so-on-snd-so-forth..hehe *PEACE*

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  16. hehehe btol tu suzai! i totally agree with u! *high 5!*

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  17. a sheikh once said in a dakwah. that yes, people will judge you especially when u are doing the right thing, and they will never stop judging, giving bad comments and all. but if we do it for the sake of Allah. then don't let the comments bring you down. who cares what they might say. as long as insyallah , Allah is please with us. :) smile sisters <3 keep on doing whats right insyallah!.

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  18. thank you natasha:) spot on girl! i should always remind myself that, it's just that sometimes i easily get annoyed with these kind of articles it's hard not to say anything, eventhough i know it's not worth arguing about it. May Allah protect us all, insyaAllah:)

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  19. Indeed~! Congrats for the article. Hopefully the author read this!

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  20. I read the article after your post - but it doesn't matter. I think you are right to be uspset with it! I am tired of people stereotyping others too! Karima

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  22. Ukhti Aishah, you have enough words to explain what's going on to the author. i agree with you. he's not supposed to condemn hijaber+hipster. he should change those who skid from the deen first. btw, you're awesome Aishah

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  23. Thanks for sharing the article. I wonder why so much disdain and pessimism. I don't see any parts in his writing as being "fine and quite supportive" as proclaimed. Hijab, tudung, headscarf or in whatever language it is refereed to shouldn't be a problem at all. The author was somehow writing under the influence of utmost bitterness. May Allah swt guide his/her soul and ours to the righteous path.

    -Diana A.R.

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  24. Hah! Rasa puas hati baca ni :D

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  25. I truly appreciate this post. I have been looking everywhere for this! Thank goodness I found it on Bing. You've made my day! Thank you again
    The Burn Machine Intermediate 8LBS Speed Bag

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  26. YESSAH! You just knocked him down, 1-0. Thanks for speaking up for us sisters love! :)

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Salam to all readers..

No disrespectful or offensive comments should be posted here that includes insulting other commentators, or Allah S.W.T or His Prophets (peace be upon them). and for guys, please respect this as a private space for women. there are too many things on this site that you should be lowering your gaze from.

thank you so much.